Find out how to get more ad attention at Quirks 2020

Quirks 2020: How to get more attention in a world of dwindling attention spans, Wednesday 12th February 2020, 2.00 pm, Room 3

There are rumours that human attention spans are dwindling – consumers have more things to focus on than ever. So, it is good news that advertising works without consumers having to pay direct attention to it. This low attention processing, which means the viewer may not even remember the ad, has been proven to have an effect on sales.

But how do you optimize your ad campaign if many of the effects are implicit? You cannot simply ask consumers. In this session will be showcasing new methodologies for ad optimization that measure explicit and implicit effects to help you maximize the impact of your campaigns.

And now for the bad news – low attention processing works for some types of ad campaigns but not for all. It all depends on what your campaign objectives are and how famous your brand already is. General brand awareness building requires a different approach to changing brand perceptions and not all ad research systems take this into account.

In our session we will also show you how you can increase the attention your advertising is receiving – through priming and accessing existing memory structures.

The way consumers pay attention is changing – it is critical that your ad optimization techniques adapt to measure ad effectiveness in a way that works now.

Don’t worry, if you can’t attend The Quirks Event but would like to find out how we can help you – please drop us an email.

New to Quirks?

The Quirk’s Event is for the best, brightest and boldest in marketing research – clients and agencies alike – exchange their most effective ideas. Throughout the day there will be a series of guest speakers hosting sessions that you can attend – giving you the perfect opportunity to keep up-to-date in the marketing world. And as our guest you can receive 20% off the entrance fee too.

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