Who would you trust?


Trust is a general belief that another party can be trusted, or the ‘willingness’ of a party to be vulnerable to the actions of another. Establishing trust is majorly important for brands to both gain and maintain customers, especially now online shopping is on the rise which many are still paranoid about.

There are a few marketing shortcuts to gaining trust in consumers. In a recent study conducted with university students by Emotional Logic, 83% participants said that they would be inclined to purchase a skin care product from a man, as well as trust his salesmanship, purely because he was wearing a white lab coat instead of day to day clothing. Though it is likely that most people would assume this means he is a doctor, there is no proof of this.

It also appears that females are more susceptible to such effect, with 95% female participants making this decision, compared to 73% males.

In the same experiment, it was found that a skincare product with ‘scientifically proven effects’ was voted to be the most trustworthy claim the product could have, with 68.2% participants agreeing with this. In the case of a food product, those that were ‘recommended by nutritionists’ were rated the most trustworthy, with 78.1% participants agreeing.

For both types of product, the claim ‘Good for you’ was rated the least trustworthy. These results show that consumers are more likely to go for products with claims related to science, even if no details are given.

Creating trust for consumers is even more important now we’re more online than ever – it is a big factor in why we choose to or not to browse online. For more information on how to understand deeper consumer motivations, please contact us today.

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